Integrator’s Manual

Introduction

This document introduces essential knowledge for how to integrate NVDLA into an SoC. It includes detail on bus interfaces, power on sequence, address map, cell requirements, testbench, and synthesis.

The open source repository contains the NVDLA design RTL, a testbench with a set of sanity tests, a performance estimation spreadheet, and a set of synthesis scripts.

Quick-Start

After downloading, to understand more about the NVDLA design, you can try out the following:

  1. Set up the Linux environment with required tools. Review Environment Setup
  2. Select a configuration and build the hardware tree. Review Tree Build
  3. Run a simulation using the included testbench. A number of sanity tests are included in the repository. See Reference Simulation Testbench
  4. Synthesize the design to review area and timing in your library. See Synthesis. You will need to map RAM’s to your RAM library. See Memories (SRAM). And update timing contraints as appropriate for your technology.
  5. Open up the Performance Model spreadsheet to look at performance with different NVDLA configurations. Configurable RTL is on the Open Source Roadmap.
  6. Integrate the NVDLA RTL into your SoC. The sanity tests that are run in the stand-alone NVDLA testbench can also be run at the SoC level and used to validate the integration. See Test Format.

Hardware System Interface

Overview

NVDLA is a fixed function accelerator engine which is targeted towards deep learning. This section introduces the NVDLA external interface and recommended connections.

System Diagram

The following diagram shows the NVDLA connections to an SoC.

System Interface Diagram

NVDLA receives commands from the host processor via the CSB interface. The two independent memory interfaces provide access to storage for data feeding NVDLA and output data from NVDLA. The interrupt provides a notification to a controlling CPU that NVDLA has completed a task.

Interfaces

NVDLA’s external pins are grouped into the following interfaces:

  1. Clock and Reset interface
  2. System Data interface
  3. Configure interface
  4. Interrupt interface
  5. Power control
  6. DFT interface

Clock and reset interface

There are two clock domains in NVDLA, dla_core_clk and dla_csb_clk. They are asynchronous with respect to each other, and have no required frequency relationship. Most of the sub-units are in dla_core_clk domain. The Csb_master sub-unit which translates configuration commands from host clock domain to dla_core_clk domain. To reduce power consumptions, clock gating technology has been deployed in NVDLA.

The main reset signal of NVDLA is dla_reset_rstn. Internal to NVDLA it’s synchronized to one of the two clock domains before use. The NVDLA design utilizaes asynchronous reset flops, so only the deassertion edge of the dla_reset_rstn signal is synchronized. The assertion edge is passed through. The other reset signal, direct_reset_, is useful for ATPG testing since it bypasses the internal synchronization.

Table 32 Clock and Reset Signals
Signal Name Description Recommended Connection
dla_core_clk Functional clock for NVDLA Always ticking clock
dla_csb_clk CSB bus clock for NVDLA configuration, same clock domain as host Clock of the configurable interface
global_clk_ovr_on Can be used to disable all non-inferred clock gates. Typically not used. Connect to a register in system controller which is reset to 0. You can also tie to low.
tmc2slcg_disable_clock_gating Disable clock gating during DFT operations. Connect system DFT controller, should be 0 in normal function mode.
direct_reset_ DFT reset to allow for direct reset controllability during ATPG testing. Typically routed to a chip level port.
dla_reset_rstn Main functional reset for DLA block. System reset controller, can be hard-wired control logic or connect to register if SW reset is desired.

System Data Interfaces (DBBIF and SRAMIF)

NVDLA accesses external data through two data master interfaces: DBBIF and SRAMIF In the RTL these are are sometimes referred to as dbb and cvsram. Later version will likely all references to dbbif and sramif. DBBIF typically is connected to off chip DRAM and provides high bandwidth with longer latency. SRAMIF is typically connected to an on-chip SRAM and provides high bandwidth with low. In current release the bus interfaces are designed to run optimally with max latency on DBBIF of up to 1440 cycles and an SRAMIF latency of up to 128 cycles. To support the two different memory subsystem characteristics there are some minor difference in implementation between the NVDLA’s bus interface logic between DBBIF and SRAMIF.

More information on the DBBIF and SRAMIF interfaces, including signal naming, can be found in the NVDLA Hardware Architecture Guide.

Configuration Interface

The host uses the CSB (Config Space Bus) interface to access NVDLA registers. Each request to CSB has a fixed request size of 32 bits of data, and has a fixed 16-bit address size. CSB does not support any form of burst requests; each packet sent down the request channel is independent from any other packet.

A detailed interface description of the configuration interface can be found in NVDLA Architecture document.

Power control

Depending on the target library the RAM cells in NVDLA could be gated to reduce power consumption when NVDLA is inactive. Each layout partition has one ram power control bus, allowing power to be ramped up/down one or more partitions at a time. If a user is using RAM cells without power controls, those signals can be tied to 0.

Table 33 Power Control Signals
Signal Name Description Recommended Connection
nvdla_pwrbus_ram_*_pd[7:0] RAM power gate. These signals are routed to the SLEEP_EN bus on the RAM macro wrappers. They can be used for controlling low power modes of the target RAMs. SoC power management unit or tie to 0
nvdla_pwrbus_ram_*_pd[8] RAM retention control. This signal is routed to the RET_EN signal on the RAM macro wrappers. It can be used for controlling retention control, or any other semi-static RAM configuration bit. SoC power management unit or tie to 0
nvdla_pwrbus_ram_*_pd[31:9] Not used Tie to 0

DFT

In current release, NVDLA has implemented one signal named test_mode to enable DFT.

Table 34 DFT Signals
Signal Name Description Recommended Connection
test_mode Enable test mode. The only use of this signal currently is to select between the functional and DFT reset signals. Should connect to the system DFT controller as needed. Otherwise, tie to 0.

Environment Setup

The Verilog code included in this release is parameterized such that multiple configurations can be generated from a single source. A hardware tree build is needed to generate the final Verilog RTL code for a given configuration. The tools required for this build are outlined below. The versions listed are used for testing.

  • Java - jdk1.7
  • Perl - perl-5.8.8
  • CPP - gcc-4.0

Tree Build

The NVDLA repository supports the build of multiple configurations based on a feature specification file. Each configuration of the NVDLA is defined by a spec file in he hw/spec/defs directory. The filename is the name of the configuration with a “.spec” exension. For the configurable release, there are currently two spec files included: “nv_large” which has 2048 INT8 MAC’s, and “nv_small” which has 64 INT8 MAC’s plus some other reductions; the non-configurable release has a single spec file, “nv_full”, which has 2048 multi-precision MAC units.

The file hw/tree.make specifies a list of configurations to build, as well as paths to tools required for building the configured RTL. To create an initial version of this file, run the following command:

cd hw
make

This command will prompt for the configuration and tool locations. It will create a tree.make file in the hw directory containing the appropriate configuration and tool setup. For subsequent changes the tree.make file can be edited directory with a text editor. Once tree.make setup is complete, the RTL can be built:

cd hw
./tools/bin/tmake -build vmod

The tmake program can also be used to launch a set of short sanity simulations. Once you’ve set up the simulation environment according to the testbench section of this document Testbench & Traces, the following command can be used to launch the short sanity regression:

./tools/bin/tmake -build verif_sim

Version control usage

NVDLA is developed in Git, on multiple branches. It is important to use the correct branch to track the development work that is desired. Currently, the following two branches exist:

  • nvdlav1: This is the default branch for any new clones of the NVDLA repository from November 21st, 2017, on. The nvdlav1 branch contains sustaining support work around the non-configurable, full-precision version of NVDLAv1 (“nv_full”). New RTL features will not be added to the nvdlav1 branch, though bug fixes may appear, as may new verification features. Users who desire a stable version of NVDLA may prefer to choose the nvdlav1 branch.
  • master: This branch contains ongoing development work on the NVDLA RTL, including work towards multiple configurations and additional feature development. This branch is expected to pass “sanity” tests, but may not always be tapeout-quality. Infrastructure in this branch may change rapidly. Users who desire the most up-to-date view of NVDLA development may prefer to choose the master branch. The master branch was the default for clones made before November 21st, 2017.

Note that the nvdlav1 branch’s history will diverge from the master branch; the master branch will not be a strict superset of the nvdlav1 branch.

Performance Model

Included in the repository is a spreadsheet based performance model. This spreadsheet models the performance for three popular convolutional networks: AlexNet, GoogleNet, and ResNet50. Additional networks could be added by following the structure of the three provided. Performance calculated is ideal performance as it doesn’t account for some software overhead. The spreadsheet is located in the repository at hw/perf/DLA_OpenSource_Performance.xlsx. The first tab in the spreadsheet, named “Readme”, describes how the model works. It calculates the following metrics.

  • Average run time for a frame
  • Frames per second
  • Hardware MAC utilization
  • Network MAC utilization

The tool can be used to look at the affect of different hardware configurations on network performance.

Designware Components

The NVDLA design utilize the following Designware components.

  • DW02_tree
  • DW_lsd
  • DW_minmax

For best QOR, the EDA vendor supplied versions should be used for both synthesis and simulation if possible. They can be obtained directly from the EDA vendors.

If no designware implementation is available, the NVDLA repository contains an implementation with an NV_ prefix to the filename and module name. These files are in the hw/vlib directory. The design can be switched to using the NV_ version of the files by setting the Verilog define macro DESIGNWARE_NOEXIST to 1; similarly, the environment variable DESIGNWARE_NOEXIST will enable this in the simulation build environment. However, these NV_ versions should not be used currently for any tapeout.

Warning

Be careful to set the DESIGNWARE_NOEXIST variable the same way for simulation as for synthesis. The NV_ variations are believed to be correct, but are not verified to the same degree as DesignWare components are; simulating different RTL than is synthesized can result in unexpected defects in a tapeout netlist.

Library Cells

There are a few library cells which the NVDLA design requires. These cells are instantiated by the design, but only behavioral models are provided. The integrator will need to provide a mapping to a technology library. Typically, the effort would be to create a Verilog wrapper module which has the same ports as the RTL version provided in the release, and which instantiates a standard cell or memory from a local library.

Synchronizers

The NVDLA design instantes four types of clock domain crossing synchronizers. These cells are modelled with RTL Verilog so they are synthesizable. However, like all synchronizers, they should be replaced with a standard cell designed to reduce MTBF. To replace, the RTL impelemtnation of the cells below can be removed (keeping the port list), and replaced with an instantiation of a standard cell synchronizer as appropriate.

  • p_SSYNC2DO_C_PP

    Two flop stage deep synchronizer with an active low asynchronous reset/clear pin.

  • p_SSYNC3DO

    Three flop stage deep synchronizer.

  • p_SSYNC3DO_C_PPP

    Three flop stage deep synchronizer with an active low asynchronous reset/clear pin.

  • p_SSYNC3DO_S_PPP

    Three flop stage deep synchronizer with an active low asynchronous set pin.

Memories (SRAM)

The memories instantiated in the NVDLA design have a logical interface which is fairly common across RAM compilers. The release contains a behavioral model for these RAMS which can be used for simulation. For synthesis, these behavioral models will need to be replaced with a Verilog wrapper which maps to RAM cells from a local library.

All functionality for a RAM can be inferred from the RAM name:

RAM<Arch>_<Depth>X<Width>[_Options]<_Mux-Option>_<Rev>

Arch        required, physical implementation of the cell:
              -PDP  pseudo-dual port SRAM.  Created by double clocking
                    a single port RAM.
              -DP   true dual port SRAM.  Always has independent read
                    and write ports.
Depth       required, number of words in the RAM
Width       required, number of bits in the RAM
Options     GL for all RAMs
Mux-Option  Required, fixed width field describing column mux options
              - Mn  Column mux specification.
Rev         Revision: E2 for DP RAMS, D2 for PDP RAMs

RAMDP: Dual-Port SRAM

This section describes a dual-port SRAM design. The macro is designed to perform read and write operations independently.

Pin Type Presence Description
Read/Write Pins
CLK_R Input; Clock Default Memory read clock
CLK_W Input; Clock Default Memory write clock
RADR_[msb:0] Input Default Synchronous read address input
RD_[msb:0] Output Default Memory read data output
RE Input Default Synchronous read enable
WADR_[msb:0] Input Default Synchronous write address input
WD_[msb:0] Input Default Synchronous write data input
WE Input Default Synchronous write enable
Misc. Pins. These will depend on the target RAM library for whether they’re necessary.
IDDQ Input Default Asynchronous stand-by mode enable pin
SLEEP_EN_[7:0] Input Default Power gating controls
RET_EN Input Default Retention enable
RET_SVOP[1:0] Input Default Timing margin control pins

RAMDP is a true dual port high density SRAM, which allows read and write to operate at the same time.

All write operations are synchronized to the rising edge of write memory clock, CLK_W. The SRAM core is written when WE = ‘1’.

Read operation is synchronized to the rising edge of the read memory clock, CLK_R. The SRAM core is read when RE = ‘1’. A latch holds the read data whenever RE = ‘0’. There is no write through capability. If the read address matches the write address, read out data may be corrupted.

Dual Port RAM Read Timing

Fig. 12 Dual Port RAM Read Timing

Dual Port RAM Write Timing

Fig. 13 Dual Port RAM Write Timing




RAMPDP: Pseudo-Dual Port SRAM

This section describes an embedded pseudo-dual port SRAM macro. The RAMPDP macro behaves like a dual port RAM, but is created by double clocking a single port RAM.

The following enumerates the RAMPDP pins and corresponding functions.

Note that: * All pin power is referenced to VDD. * All enables are active high.

Pin Type Presence Description
Read/Write Pins
CLK Input; Clock Default Memory clock
RADR_[msb:0] Input Default Synchronous read address input
RD_[msb:0] Output Default Memory read data output
RE Input Default Synchronous read enable
WADR_[msb:0] Input Default Synchronous write address input
WD_[msb:0] Input Default Synchronous write data input
WE Input Default Synchronous write enable
Misc. Pins. These will depend on the target RAM library for whether they are necessary.
IDDQ Input Default Asynchronous stand-by mode enable pin
SLEEP_EN_[7:0] Input Default Power gating controls
RET_EN Input Default Retention enable
RET_SVOP[1:0] Input Default Timing margin control pins
Pseudo Dual Port RAM Timing

Fig. 14 Pseudo Dual Port RAM Timing

The RAMPDP behaves like a dual port RAM, but is created by double clocking a single port RAM. It can perform a ‘single read’ (1R), a ‘single write’ (1W) or a ‘read followed by write’ (1R+1W) operation in any given clock cycle. A read operation is performed when the signal RE is active high (RE= ‘1’). The output data will be driven to the output port RD in the same cycle read commands are issued. A latch holds the read data when ‘RE’=0. A write operation is performed when WE is high (WE= ‘1’). The input data must be put on the input data bus WD at the same time with the write command. Note that if the read and write address match during a (1R+1W) operation, i.e. RE=WE=’1’, the read data will contain the previous contents of the RAM (read occurs before write).

Synthesis

Overview

This release contains reference synthesis setup for the NVDLA design with Design Compiler (Wireload Model/Topographical).

Directory structure

The release directory structure for synthesis is shown below:

<NVDLA_RELEASE>
   |--- syn
   |--- scripts
   |       |--- syn_launch.sh
   |       |--- default_config.sh
   |       |--- dc_run.tcl
   |       |--- dc_interactive.tcl
   |       `--- dc_app_vars.tcl
   |--- templates
   |       |--- config.sh
   |       `--- cg_latency_lut.tcl
   `--- cons
          |--- NV_NVDLA_partition_a.sdc
          |--- NV_NVDLA_partition_c.sdc
          |--- NV_NVDLA_partition_m.sdc
          |--- NV_NVDLA_partition_o.sdc
          `--- NV_NVDLA_partition_p.sdc

NV_NVDLA_partition_* are synthesis “TOP_NAMES” - The designs will be compiled at this hierarchy, and netlists will be generated for these designs. These are independent sub-designs for synthesis, which are instantiated in a top-level wrapper.

Requirements

You will need a *NIX machine able to run Design Compiler. The scripts have been tested with Design Compiler version 2016.12 and newer. Memory and CPU requirements vary.

Synthesis Configuration

To be able to run synthesis, you will need a config file - You can use the “<NVDLA_ROOT>/syn/dc/templates/config.sh” file as reference. This file is in “bash” syntax.

There are many required and optional variables. Table below lists the supported variables, meanings and defaults.



Table 35 Design Related Options
Variable Comments
NVDLA_ROOT Location on disk for the NVDLA source “hw” directory.
TOP_NAMES Space separated list of TOP_NAMES to synthesize. You may choose to synthesize all or a subset of TOP_NAMES. Defaults to “NV_NVDLA_partition_a NV_NVDLA_partition_c NV_NVDLA_partition_o NV_NVDLA_partition_m NV_NVDLA_partition_p”
RTL_SEARCH_PATH Space separated list of search paths (directories) for locating all the pieces of RTL. Defaults to an empty string. Please do not include paths to non synthesizable (behavioral) RAM models, like the ones in ${NVDLA_ROOT}/vmod/rams/model
RTL_INCLUDE_SEARCH_PATH Space separated list of search paths (directories) for locating all the supplementary Verilog include files. Defaults to an empty string.
EXTRA_RTL List of files to read in, apart from the modules that can be found in the search paths. Defaults to an empty string.
RTL_EXTENSIONS List of extensions for the source RTL files. Defaults to “.v .sv .gv”
RTL_INCLUDE_EXTENSIONS List of extensions for supplementary Verilog include files. Defaults to “.vh .svh”
DEF

Path to directory containing floorplans in the “DEF” format. Files should be named by the TOP_NAMES, with the extension “.def” This variable defaults to a directory called “def” in the current directory

We do not provide templates, because it depends on the process node, and the memory compiler being used.

CONS

Path to directory containing constraints in the “SDC” format. Files should be named by the TOP_NAMES, with the extension “.sdc” This directory may also contain “<TOP_NAME>.tcl” to specify any non-SDC constraints to guide synthesis. All of these constraints are sourced before compiling the design. This variable defaults to a directory called “cons” in the current directory.

We provide template SDCs for all logical partitions in the ${NVDLA_ROOT}/syn/cons directory including clock constraints etc. You may provide your own constraints, based on the process node you are targeting.




Table 36 Tool Related Options
Variable Comments
DC_PATH Location of the Design Compiler installation. Defaults to an empty string



Table 37 Library Related Options
Variable Comments
TARGET_LIB Path to a single standard cell library that will be used to map the design to (the “target” library). Defaults to an empty string.
LINK_LIB Path to all the libraries that are required to link the design. This should include the target library as well. Include any RAM compiler timing libraries here. Defaults to an empty string.
TF_FILE Path to the “Milkyway Technology File” that is used to create the Milkyway models for the physical library. Please check with your standard cell library vendor for the right file to use. Defaults to an empty string. Required for DC-Topographical
TLUPLUS_FILE Path to the “TLUPlus” files that will be used for RC extraction Please check with your standard cell library vendor for the right file to use. Defaults to an empty string. Required for DC-Topographical
TLUPLUS_MAPPING_FILE Path to the “Tech2ITF” mapping file, that maps layer names from between the Milkyway Tech file and the interconnect technology format file. Please check with your standard cell library vendor for the right file to use. Defaults to an empty string. Required for DC-Topographical
MIN_ROUTING_LAYER Bottom routing layer for signal nets. Please check with place-and-route methodology for the right value. Defaults to an empty string. Required for DC-Topographical
MAX_ROUTING_LAYER Top routing layer for signal nets. Please check with place-and-route methodology for the right value. Defaults to an empty string. Required for DC-Topographical
HORIZONTAL_LAYERS Space separated list of layers with preferred horizontal routing. Defaults to an empty string.
VERTICAL_LAYERS Space separated list of layers with preferred vertical routing. Defaults to an empty string.
DONT_USE_LIST Space separated list of regular expressions for cells that you do not wish to map your design to. A “dont_use” will be applied on these cells in Design Compiler. Defaults to an empty string.
WIRELOAD_MODEL_FILE A file containing a “wireload model” - a lookup table for resistance and capacitance calculation based on fanout. Refer to the lcug16_Defining_Wire_Load_Groups.htm on the Synopsys Solvnet site for more information regarding wire load modeling. Not required if your standard cell library contains the wireload models built in. Not required for DC-Topographical. Defaults to an empty string.
WIRELOAD_MODEL_NAME Name of the wireload model lookup table (if you have multiple tables) Not required for DC-Topographical. Defaults to an empty string.



Warning

We do not supply timing models or synthesizable RTL for the RAMs in the design. These need to be provided by the user for the process node/ memory compiler being used.

Please DO NOT include ${NVDLA_ROOT}/vmod/rams/model in the RTL_SEARCH_PATH - They are simulation models, not synthesizable.

Table 38 Miscellaneous Options
Variable Comments
TIGHTEN_CGE Boolean, “1” to enable over constraining the CG-Enable paths. See section 5.5.2 below Default is set to “0”
CGLUT_FILE File containing the fanout-based CG over constraint lookup table to pessimize the CG enable paths. See section 5.5.2 below. Please see “${NVDLA_ROOT}/syn/templates/cg_latency_lut.tcl” for an example. Defaults to an empty string.
DC_NUM_CORES The number of CPU cores available for Design Compiler. Defaults to ‘1’ Note: Single CPU core synthesis may see a long overall runtime.
AREA_RECOVERY Boolean, “1” to Run quick area optimization by undoing some optimizations on paths with positive slack. Defaults to “1”.
INCREMENTAL_RECOMPILE_COUNT Number of rounds of incremental compiles to run in Design Compiler. Defaults to “1” - This amounts to 2 rounds of compile, one for mapping - the “main” compile and one for incremental optimization - the “incremental” compile.
COMMAND_PREFIX

String. Defaults to an empty string. This will be pre-fixed to the dc_shell command . Use this to manage job submission on LSF farm or grid, as appropriate. Use literal strings “<MODULE>” and “<LOG>” to substitute module name and log directory for each TOP_NAMES. In the absence of a command prefix, the synthesis jobs for each TOP_NAMES will run serially. If you do provide a command prefix, make sure that it is non-blocking, so that all synthesis jobs can be parallelized. Otherwise, the jobs are run serially. Example:

export COMMAND_PREFIX="bsub -q some_queue -o <LOG>/<MODULE>.lsf.log"

Synthesis constraints

Clock Constraints

The clock constraints are provided through an SDC file. You will find reference constraints in “${NVDLA_ROOT}/syn/cons/NV_NVDLA_partition*.sdc”. These contain clock targets for the 16nm process. You will need to scale the clock constraints to the target process/synthesis corner as appropriate. The SDC files also contain some timing exceptions (false paths) as well. Please populate the SDC files for all TOP_NAMES in a single directory, and set the CONS variable in the configuration file described in the previous section.

You can also add additional non-SDC constraints, like, for example, specific clock gating styles, etc. in <CONS>/NV_NVDLA_partition*.tcl

Clock Gate Enable Path Over constraining

The flow allows for over constraining the CG enable paths to pessimize synthesis to take into account post-CTS latencies. This is achieved through a fanout-based lookup table in TCL syntax. See “${NVDLA_ROOT}/syn/templates/cg_latency_lut.tcl” for an example. Provide the path to this file as the CGLUT_FILE variable in the configuration file. To enable the over constraining, please set TIGHTEN_CGE variable to 1 in the configuration file.

Physical Constraints

If you are running physical synthesis, you can provide floorplans in DEF syntax for RAM/IO placement as input, depending on your physical implementation. Populate the DEF files for all TOP_NAMES in a single directory, and provide the path to the directory as the DEF variable.

You can also provide constraints in TCL syntax, through “<CONS>/NV_NVDLA_partition*.tcl” files.

Running synthesis

You can run synthesis using the “${NVDLA_ROOT}/syn/dc/scripts/syn_launch.sh” bash script. The supported arguments to the scripts are in table below.


Table 39 Miscellaneous Options
Argument Explanation
-config Path to the synthesis configuration file (see section 5.4) If not provided, the flow will look for a file called “config.sh” in the current directory.
-mode

Specifies which tool to use for synthesis. Use one of the following:

“wlm” => Use Design Compiler (non-topographical) for wireload model based synthesis (non-physical)
“dct” => Use DC-Topographical
“dcg” => Use DC-Graphical along with “-spg” in the compile command.
“de”  => Use DC Explorer for synthesis.
-build Sandbox of synthesis. Optional. Defaults to “nvdla_syn_<timestamp>
-modules Space separated list of modules to run synthesis on / restore database for. If not specified, the TOP_NAMES must be populated in the configuration file.
-restore Path to design database (in DDC format) to restore.

Running Non-physical synthesis (Wireload Models)

You can run:

${NVDLA_ROOT}/syn/dc/scripts/syn_launch.sh -mode wlm -config /path/to/config.sh

You will need to have a wire load model defined in your standard cell library, or in a separate file (in liberty syntax, as described in the lcug16_Defining_Wire_Load_Groups.htm on Synopsys solvnet)

In the configuration file the following variables are required to be defined:

WIRELOAD_MODEL_NAME
TARGET_LIB
LINK_LIB
DC_PATH

The following variables are optional:

WIRELOAD_MODEL_FILE

Running physical synthesis

You can run one of the following, To pick DC-Topographical/DC-Graphical/DC Explorer:

${NVDLA_ROOT}/syn/dc/scripts/syn_launch.sh -mode dct -config /path/to/config.sh
${NVDLA_ROOT}/syn/dc/scripts/syn_launch.sh -mode dcg -config /path/to/config.sh
${NVDLA_ROOT}/syn/dc/scripts/syn_launch.sh -mode de -config /path/to/config.sh

In the configuration file, the following variables are required to be defined:

TARGET_LIB
LINK_LIB
MW_LIB
DC_PATH
TF_FILE
TLUPLUS_FILE
TLUPLUS_MAPPING_FILE
MIN_ROUTING_LAYER
MAX_ROUTING_LAYER

Additionally, you may require the following variables depending on how your physical library views were built:

HORIZONTAL_LAYERS
VERTICAL_LAYERS

Restoring a design database

You can run one of the following, To restore a design database from a previous synthesis run with the reference methodology:

${NVDLA_ROOT}/syn/dc/scripts/syn_launch.sh -mode <mode_used_for_synthesis> -config /path/to/config.sh -build <build_tag_used_for_synthesis> -restore /path/to/build/db/<module>.ddc -modules <module>

Synthesis outputs

In the synthesis sandbox, the following outputs are generated:

<BUILD>
   |--- fv
   |     `--- NV_NVDLA_parition*
   |              `--- NV_NVDLA_parition*.svf
   |--- net
   |     |--- NV_NVDLA_partition*.gv (Mapped Netlist)
   |     |--- NV_NVDLA_partition*.full.def (complete output DEF)
   |     `--- NV_NVDLA_partition*.sdc (Output SDC)
   |--- db
   |     `--- NV_NVDLA_partition*.ddc (Synthesis design Database)
   |           (There are also a few intermediate design databases here)
   `--- report
           |--- NV_NVDLA_partition*.check_design
           |--- NV_NVDLA_partition*.check_timing
           `--- NV_NVDLA_partition*.final.report
                      (Detailed timing/QoR information)
                      (There are also reports generated at intermediate stages)

Testbench & Traces

This section describes the trace-player testbench and traces supplied with the release. The testbench is intended to be used to validate basic RTL functionality, and to provide a reference for RTL integration efforts. The tests themselves are inteded to work either in the included testbench or within an SoC simulation. When used within an SoC simulation, it is expected that the SoC’s processor will playing back the trace and responding to NVDLA interrupts. The trace format is documented below.

Tests

The NVDLA repository contains seven basic sanity tests, and two layer tests. Additional tests will be added periodically.

Basic sanity tests

  • sanity0 - basic register write and compare read-back value
  • sanity1 - memory copy test using bdma (dbb to dbb), test ends using register polling
  • sanity2 - sanity1 waiting on interrupts instead of register polling
  • sanity3 - convolution test, test ends using register polling and compares output mem region to determine passing
  • sanity3_cvsram - convolution test, uses cvsram path instead of dbb, test ends using register polling and compares output mem region to determine passing

Short single function tests using dbb

  • conv_8x8_fc_int16
  • pdp_max_pooling_int16
  • sdp_relu_int16

Long layer tests

  • googlenet_conv2_3x3_int16 - uses cvsram, 30 min runtime
  • cc_alexnet_conv5_relu5_int16_dtest_cvsram - uses cvsram, 156 min runtime

The long layer tests are not in the regress target. Run using

  • make run TESTDIR=../traces/traceplayer/googlenet_conv2_3x3_int16
  • make run TESTDIR=../traces/traceplayer/cc_alexnet_conv5_relu5_int16_dtest_cvsram

Test Format

Tests will be in trace form and will support seven commands: cpu read/write, memory read/write, memory load/dump, and interrupt wait.

Tests read in input.txn in what we call “trace” format which is a file containing a list of register and memory accesses that will be used by the test before finishing the simulation. The script in synth_tb/sim_scripts/inp_txn_to_hexdump.pl reads input.txn and outputs input.txn.raw containing encodings for the csb master sequencer to read and execute from.

Hardware Config Read/Write Commands

The main test trace performs register reads/writes to the NVDLA IP. These commands will cause reads and write commands to the CSB programming bus.

Reg read and write Commands are listed in the following table.

Command Description
write_reg <misc:16><addr:16> <data:32>

Execute a 32b data write to a 16b addr.

addr is calculated from (documented register address - NVDLA_GLB.S_NVDLA_HW_VERSION_0.offset) >> 2. Left shift by 2 because hardware expects the word address.

Bit 1 of misc (bit 17 of 32b field) means CSB master will wait for wr_complete or error before sending next read or write. Bit 0 of misc (bit 16 of 32b field) is 1 for writes and 0 for reads.

inp_txn_to_hexdump.pl will correct the rd/wr bit based on read_reg/write_reg cmd. Examples:

write_reg 0x00030200 0x1234c0de //Wait for wr_complete or error
write_reg 0x00010200 0x1234da7a //Don't wait for wr_complete or error
read_reg <misc:16><addr:16> <bitmask:32> <expectedData:32>

Execute a polling read to 16b addr and poll until (returnData & bitmask) == expectedData. Number of polls will be equal to +read_reg_poll_retries (default 50). Examples:

read_reg  0x00000200 0xffffffff 0x1234da7a //0x0020 read back should be 0x1234da7a

Memory Read/Write Commands

To accelerate simulation these trace commands perform reads/writes directly to the memory model.

Memory read and write Commands are listed in the following table.

Command Description
write_mem <addr:64> <bytemask:16> <wdata:128> Execute a 128b data write with corresponding 16 byte mask to 64b addr.
read_mem <addr:64> <bitmask:128> <expectedData:128>

Execute a polling read to 64b addr and poll until 128b expectedData is met. Number of polls will be equal to +read_mem_poll_retries (default 50). Example:

read_mem 0x41000000 0xffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffff
                    0x00000000000000000000000000080000

Memory Load/Dump Command

To further accelerate simulation, the trace supports loading and dumping of memory directly to/from a file.

Command Description
load_mem <addr:64> <num_bytes:32> <string> Use Verilog $readmemh() to load memory with 32b num_bytes at 64b addr from file, “string”.
dump_mem <addr:64> <num_bytes:32> <string> Use Verilog $writememh() to dump 32b num_bytes at 64b addr of memory to file, “string”.

Interrupt Wait Command

This command allows for trace replay to pause while NVDLA completes a task. An interrupt from NVDLA will resume trace execution.

Command Description
wait <level/edge> <irq#>

Block the current trace until either an interrupt level or edge is detected:

wait high dla_intr     // Wait for high level on dla_intr
wait low dla_intr      // Wait for low level on dla_intr
wait posedge dla_intr  // Wait for posedge on dla_intr
wait negedge dla_intr  // Wait for negedge on dla_intr

Reference Simulation Testbench

CSB Master Trace Player

The trace player is an master agent that reads a test vector file, typically input.txn, in the format as described in the Tests section. It parses and supports seven operations: polling read and write to/from NVDLA; polling read and write directly to/from memory; file load and dump directly to/from memory; and wait for interrupt. The memory write, load, and dump commands occur in zero simulation time. The polling memory read function retries after 100 clocks up to 100 times, by default. The read_mem retry and delay counts are configurable with the +read_mem_poll_retries and +read_mem_poll_interval_clocks plusargs, respectively. The polling reg read functions retries after 100 clocks upto 100 times, by default. The read_reg retry and delay counts are configurable with the +read_reg_poll_retries and +read_reg_poll_interval_clocks plusargs, respectively. The reg write functions blocks until the write transaction is accepted by the NVDLA. The wait blocks until the interrupt event occurs.

DBBIF Slave Agent

The DBBIF slave agent captures DBBIF memory transactions and issues reads and writes to memory. The NVDLA and environment supports one slave agent per memory region, 16B/clk.

CVSRAM Slave Agent

The CVSRAM slave agent captures CVSRAM memory transactions and issues reads and writes to a section of memory logically separate from DBB. The NVDLA and environment supports one slave agent per memory region, 16B/clk.

Memory Stub

The memory stub is a large, linear addressable Verilog memory array. It’s accessed by the NVDLA via the DBBIF slave agent. It can also be triggered by the CSB Master agent to load or store contents to/from memory via files to reduce overall run time. The memory stub file access is trigged by load/dump_mem calls within the trace.

Running a Test (using make)

The user should “cd” into the ‘export_top/verif/sim’ directory to execute the Makefile targets described in the sections below. Note that the Makefile can run multiple tests in parallel by supplying the batch launch command in the export_top/verif/sim/Makefile ‘LSF_COMMAND’ variable. E.g, if the user launches jobs to LSF with ‘bsub –q <LSF queue name>’, the user can set the LSF_COMMAND variable to this string in the Makefile:

LSF_COMMAND := bsub –q <LSF queue name>

Now when the user runs a multi-test regression, the tests will run in parallel via LSF.

The make targets are described below.

  • make sanity

    This target will build everything that is needed for any simulation. It is the first thing that should be done. This make target will also run one test. With this target, the user can determine if there are any compile or runtime issues with the installation and/or environment in a reasonably short period of time.

  • make all

    This target will build everything that is needed for any simulation. This make target will also run the regression set of tests. See make regress for more details.

  • make build

    This target will just generate and execute the VCS compile command line. If test bench code is changed, this target is used to recompile and generated the VCS based simulation executable.

  • make run

    This target will run a test. Default is the same test that was run with the make all target. Additional arguments for this target are:

    DUMP=[0|1]  (specifies if waves are to be dumped or not.  0 is default, which
                 indicates that waves will not be dumped out).
    TESTDIR=<testDirectory>  (pass a different test that the default which
                              is ../traces/traceplayer/sanity0)
    
    Examples command lines::

    make run DUMP=1 TESTDIR=../traces/traceplayer/sanity0 make run DUMP=0 TESTDIR=../traces/traceplayer/conv_8x8_fc_int16

    All packaged tests will be found in the verif/traces/* directories. Within each test directory there is an ‘input.txn’ file which is a list of the input transactions executed against the DUT. During simulation an overall log file and also a master transaction and slave transaction log will be generated to help debug or view what is happening during the simulation. These logs will be found after the simulation in the same directory as the location of the test input file. The VCS log will be named <TESTDIR>/test.log.

  • make regress

    This will run the entire regression serially. At the end of the regression a message will be displayed to user to check the results of the regression by issuing make check_regress. The make check_regress will display the results of each test run. Before running a large regression run a mini regression to make sure there are no environment or build issues. A mini regression can be kicked off with:

    make regress MINIREGRESS=1
    

    One can also run regressions in parallel by using the -j<NUM> make option. For example, to run a full regression where 3 tests are running simultaneously, but only from the functional set of traces use:

    make -j3 regress
    
  • make show_plusargs

    This target will display test plus args to be used at run time as well as vcs build args to be used at compile time.

  • make check

    This target runs the ‘export_top/verif/sim/checktest[_synthtb].pl’ script that reports status for a specified test. For a performance test with a local perf_regs file, it will report the performance score of the test. For tests with backdoor data, it will also compare the final test memory image with the expected image and report results of the comparison.

  • make check_regress

    This target is similar to make check but operates on the entire regression.

  • make dve

    This target will bring up the synopsys Discovery Visual Environment (DVE) waveform viewer so that input and output signals to the NVDLA can be observed.

  • make dumper

    This target will build the necessary targets if you want to generate verdi or siloti waveform formats. This target can be kicked off in parallel with the make build target. It is not added to the make all target, since not all users have the verdi environment.

  • make verdi

    This target will bring up the verdi design browser and waveform viewer, so that the input and output signals and transactions can be graphically viewed over time.

  • make siloti

    This target will bring up the siloti design browser and waveform viewer , so that the input and output signals and transactions can be graphically viewed over time. This dumping format is smaller/faster and more efficient.

Makefile Run Options

The user can specify one or more of the following options during the execution of the make targets.

Macro Option Default Description
DUMP=[0|1] 0 Controls whether or not waveforms are dumped during the simulation. 1=Dump waveforms. 0=no waveforms dumped.
MINIREGRESS=[0|1] 0

Control whether to run a mini sanity regression with make regress:

1=Run mini-sanity regression.
0=Don’t run mini-sanity regression.
PLUSARGS=[“listOfUserPlusOptions”] “”

See options described in the runtime configuration options section later in this document. The user can supply one or more arguments for run time control of the tests. This option can be used with the following make targets: sanity, all, run, and regress. For example:

PLUSARGS=”+mem_read_latency=80 +read_reg_poll_retries=10000”
REGRESSTYPE=[FUNC|PERF|APP|ALL] ALL Guides make regress to run FUNCtional, PERFormance, APPlication, or ALL tests.
TESTDIR=[pathToTestDirectory] ../traces/traceplayer/sanity0 Specify the test to run.

Makefile Config

The Makefile uses the following major variables to for tool setup. They should set appropriately based on the environment.

Macro Default Description
VCS_HOME /home/tools/vcs/mx-2015.09-SP2-9-T0426 Path to VCS, including version.
VCS_CC /home/utils/gcc-4.7.2/bin/g++ C compiler used by VCS.
LM_LICENSE_FILE /home/tools/admin/license_files License file for VCS.
VERDI_HOME /home/tools/debussy/verdi3_2015.09-SP2-11 Path to verdi waveform viewer.
NOVAS_HOME /home/tools/debussy/verdi3_2015.09-SP2-11 Path to verdi waveform viewer.
DUMP 0 Control whether or not waveforms are dumped during the simulation. 1=Dump waveforms. 0=No waveforms dumped.
DUMPER DVE Format of the waveform file will by default be in dve format. To put in Novas’ verdi format use DUMPER=VERDI . To use Novas essential signal list format use DUMPER=SILOTI
IMAGEVIEWER gimp Path to bit map image viewing tool.
VERDI_DUMP_NAME debussy Name of the verdi dump files
SILOTI_DUMP_NAME siloti Name of the siloti (esa enhanced) dump files
VCS_EXECUTABLE simv Used to specify the name of the generated simulation executable.
TESTDIR ../traces/traceplayer/sanity0 Used to specify the test that user wants to run.
REGRESS_LIST see Makefile Used to specify the list of tests via directory names that should be run in a regression
DEFAULT_PLUSARGS +continue_on_fail +read_reg_poll_retries=100 +read_reg_poll_interval_clocks=100 +read_reg_timeout_clocks=100000 Default simulator run time arguments. See simulator runtime options described later in this document.

There are other tools that the Makefile uses and these may need to be adjusted to the customer Linux environment. The following table lists these variables.

Macro Default Description
AWK /usr/bin/awk Standard awk. Used as a pattern scanning and processing language
CAT /bin/cat Path to default cat for concatenating files and printing to standard output.
CSH /bin/csh Path to the environment C shell executable.
EGREP /bin/egrep Standard egrep. Used to print lines matching a pattern when passed regexpressions.
GREP /bin/grep Standard grep. Used to print lines matching a pattern.
LS /bin/ls Standard ls for listing what is in a direcotory.
MD5SUM /usr/bin/md5sum compute and check MD5 message digest
PERL /home/utils/perl-5.14/5.14.1-nothreads-64/bin/perl Standard perl installation, for executing perl scripts.
RM /bin/rm Path to the environment rm executable. Used to remove files and directories.
TAR /bin/tar The GNU version of the tar archiving utility
TEE /bin/cp Standard tee for reading from standard input and writing to standard output and files.

Test Success

Initial Test success can be seen at the bottom of the standard output after running a test (i.e. after make run) or by using the make check TESTDIR=<testDirectory> target. After a full regression, the user can also use the make check_regress target to see the results of all tests that have been run.

The following shows an example of the make check output:

Checking sanity0 test.log
checktest : PASSED : sanity0

The following shows an example of the make check_regress output (the user’s specific results may look different depending on which test directories were released in the delivered package):

checktest : PASSED : sanity0
checktest : PASSED : sanity1
checktest : PASSED : sanity2
checktest : okPASS : conv_8x8_fc_int16: all transactions completed : with 2 non fatal errors

The above output would indicate that all tests passed except the conv_8x8_fc_int16 test which had some non-fatal error message that should be looked at. If the user has done a clean install and not changed any code, the user should expect to see all regression tests passing. If the test is a performance test, then make check will also print an additional line called ‘checkperf’ which will report the performance score of the test, and highlight the delta versus expected.

Success Via Looking At Logfile

In addition, the user can go look at the log file. At the bottom of the test log one would see text that typically follows the following format:

4020.50ns MSEQ: Backdoor mem_dump of file            0.chiplib_replay.raw2 at address 0x80400000 for length 0x00000020.
$finish called from file "/home/scratch.stephenh_t194/nvdla_git/hw/verif/synth_tb/csb_master_seq.v", line 271.
$finish at simulation time       4520.90ns
           V C S   S i m u l a t i o n   R e p o r t
Time: 4520900 ps
CPU Time:      4.410 seconds;       Data structure size: 430.9Mb
Mon Sep 25 13:28:44 2017
$finish called.

As long as the user sees that there are zero ERRORs and zero FATAL errors, then the test executed successfully. The user should still check the output of checktest_synthtb.pl to verify that mem_dump matches the reference output.

Runtime Configuration

  • CSB Master Trace Player

    At runtime, the user can specify various run time control and debug options in the trace player. By default, no change is required to pass provided tests.

    Plusarg Description
    +ignore_poll Don’t retry if poll mismatches. Just continue running.
    +continue_on_fail Retry polls if they mismatch but continue running instead of dying if the limit is hit.
    +ignore_badf If a register read returns badf, continue instead of polling. (Used to ignore bad registers in the trace.)
    +read_reg_poll_retries=<cnt> Number of retries on reg read.
    +read_mem_poll_retries=<cnt> Number of retries on mem read.
    +read_reg_poll_interval_clocks=<clks> Number of clocks to wait after a bad reg match, before retrying
    +read_mem_poll_interval_clocks=<clks> Number of clocks to wait after a bad mem match, before retrying
    +intr_timeout_clocks=<clks> Number of clocks to wait after a bad interrupt wait, before fatal error.
  • DBBIF Interface To Memory Subsystem

    At runtime, the behavior of the DBBIF interface to the memory subsystem can be altered with Verilog plusargs. The user can specify the following.

    Plusarg Description
    +mem_bandwidth_pct=<pct> and +mem_bandwidth_window=<clks> Bandwidth: Memory bandwidth can be configured with the plusargs +mem_bandwidth_pct, and +mem_bandwidth_window. mem_bandwidth_pct (default 50) is a percentage which says how often a data beat can be transferred across the interface. mem_bandwidth_window is the number of clocks to use as the averaging window for computing the utilization percentage (default 100). This percentage reflects the combined read/write bandwidth of both memory interfaces. As an example, 100% bandwidth utilization would imply that for every clock cycle, write data was being written on both mem0/mem1, and read data was being returned on both mem0/mem1. At 400MHz * 16 bytes * 4 lanes. 100% utilization implies a combined bandwidth of 25.6GB/sec. To limit bandwidth to 12.8GB/sec, a mem_bandwidth_pct of 50 would be used (at most 2 of 4 bidirectional lanes active per clock, on average).
    +mem_read_latency=<clks> Read latency: The read latency of the memory can be configured with the plusarg +mem_read_latency. The value of the parameter determines the number of clock cycles between when the read is accepted and when the read return valid signal is asserted. The default value is 180 (450ns @ 400MHz), and the maximum value is 1000.
    +mem_write_latency=<clks> Write to write ack latency: The write latency of the memory can be configured with the plusarg +mem_write_latency. The value of the parameter determines the number of clock cycles between when the last beat of write data is finished, and when the write response valid signal is asserted. The default value is 30 (75ns @ 400MHz), and the maximum value is 1000.
    +max_txn_outstanding_per_channel=<txn> Outstanding transaction count: +max_txn_outstanding_per_channel specifies the total combined read + write transactions that are allowed to be outstanding per channel at any moment of time. The default value is 128.
    +max_rd_outstanding_per_channel=<txn> Outstanding read transaction count: +max_rd_outstanding_per_channel limits the number of read transactions that are allowed to be outstanding per channel at any moment of time. The default value is 128.
    +max_wr_outstanding_per_channel=<txn> Outstanding write transaction count: +max_wr_outstanding_per_channel limits the number of write transactions that are allowed to be outstanding per channel at any moment of time. The default value is 128.